How We Create for One World

One World. That’s already a fact. We are billions of bodies and souls living on one planet. We don’t always act like it. The facts are there, we need a new perspective. 

In the words of Pieter Hooft, a Dutch poet and historian: omnibus idem — the same to all. What does this mean and how do we achieve this? Pieter often said that the sun shines for all. How simple and true that rings. If the sun doesn’t discriminate, why do we? 

The most productive action we can take is making educated and intentional decisions. Learn from our mistakes and grow. Well, this is what my plan is and I will apply it to all I do.


A year ago I had an amazing journaling session and I discovered that my purpose (at the time it wasn’t all the way clear) is to guide talented creatives into the world via entrepreneurship. I reached out to an old college friend, El Lewis, whom I had watched from afar as an amazingly talented and sought after designer in NYC. 

The conversation went like this: “Hey have you ever thought about launching an apparel line?” and El said “For the past few months that’s actually all that’s come up for me!”. Of course, I’m paraphrasing — we talked for about an hour and caught up on everything that had gone on in the years we haven’t seen each other. 

And so it started — O. Apparel.


O. is launching November 1st. I’m writing this as we’re waiting for the last iteration of our samples to arrive. We’re finalizing our website, making sure we make it as easy and accessible as we can. Going through copy and making sure that we are clear in our messaging: we are designing tech knits for creatives. That’s it. Not creatives of certain skin color, gender, race, religion, orientation, etc. 

And we’re creating this brand with as little negative impact on the world as we can. Unfortunately, as PR-friendly the term “zero carbon footprint” is, my belief is that it’s actually impossible for a company that delivers a physical product to achieve this. What we are choosing to do instead is to get as close as we can and to be completely transparent in the process. 

We are designing tech knits for creatives. That’s it.Not creatives of certain skin color, gender, race, religion, orientation, etc.

 

Currently, we are using a polyester and nylon yarn blend for our Commander and Pilot tops. Compared to Cotton (and other natural fibers), it has no land impact. That means that it doesn’t take up any natural resources that grow on land, or any otherwise usable landmass. Also unlike natural fibers, it uses very little water in growing it. It’s made from oil however and that’s not an ideal resource use, but it doesn’t use fertilizers that further pollute the soil in the production process. While synthetic fibers do have a higher energy cost to grow and spin the fiber than natural, it takes significantly less energy than natural fiber to dye. 

Unfortunately, as PR-friendly the term “zero carbon footprint” is, my belief is that it’s actually impossible for a company that delivers a physical product to achieve this.

 

Reading the comparison, the truth is neither are as good as we want them to be, but we opted for synthetic for now because it will last a lot longer and therefore go against the toxic idea of “fast fashion” that we are trying to combat. Our design is simple and timeless for the same reason — we don’t want to create a “hot” seasonal item and then force our consumer to purchase the new style next season, discarding and adding more to our landfill. We’re about creating a uniform that can be incorporated in your existing wardrobe to add some character and moveability to what you already own and wear.

We’re about creating a uniform that can be incorporated in your existing wardrobe to add some character and moveability to what you already own and wear.

 

This is where we’re working on making O. and the industry better in the next wave of development and order: we are working with the renewable and recycle fiber manufacturers and improving our sampling waste. 


We are currently pursuing a relationship with AlgiKnit, a company that’s creating yarn out of algae. This fiber has a low production cost, little effect on the environment and after being discarded it disintegrated back into the algae that it came from. Another option we are pursuing is a fiber made out of recycled water bottles, thus removing excess plastic from our environment. 

For our sample production, we will opt for a 3D rendering, preserving wasted yarn due to “imperfect samples”. To add to that we are removing the transport impact the samples create when traveling from our manufacturers to us and back. 

Long term, we are going to use a model that may seem shocking today, the same way a portable computer seemed in the 70s. We will create digital renderings of clothing that you can then impose seamlessly onto yourself or a picture of yourself using VR technology we are currently developing. Yes, we see a world where a big part of your clothes, especially the unique, abstract and downright crazy items aren’t ever made in the real world, but can still make it on your newsfeed. And that’s zero carbon footprint for you. 

We will create digital renderings of clothing that you can then impose seamlessly onto yourself or a picture of yourself using VR technology we are currently developing.

 

Follow our journey and talk to us. O. is about you. We want to create meaningful relationships with our customers. You all are the reason this company has been created — to give a better, more honest and transparent version with a pure and simple design that unites the world through apparel. 

 

Love,

O.

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